How To Fix Vertigo?

What is BPPV?

What is Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)?

Adapted from information provided by Timothy C. Hain, MD

In Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) dizziness is generally thought to be due to debris which has collected within a part of the inner ear.  This debris can be thought of  as “ear rocks”, although the formal name is “otoconia”. Ear rocks are small crystals of calcium carbonate derived from a structure in the ear called the “utricle” (figure1 ).

BPPV is a common cause of dizziness. About 20% of all dizziness is due to BPPV. While BPPV can occur in children (Uneri and Turkdogan, 2003), the older you are, the more likely it is that your dizziness is due to BPPV. About 50% of all dizziness in older people is due to BPPV. In a recent study, 9% of a group of urban dwelling elders were found to have undiagnosed BPPV (Oghalai, J. S., et al., 2000). 

The symptoms of BPPV include dizziness or vertigo, lightheadedness, imbalance, and nausea. Activities which bring on symptoms will vary among persons, but symptoms are almost always precipitated by a change of position of the head with respect to gravity. Getting out of bed or rolling over in bed are common “problem” motions . Because people with BPPV often feel dizzy and unsteady when they tip their heads back to look up, sometimes BPPV is called “top shelf vertigo.” Women with BPPV may find that the use of shampoo bowls in beauty parlors brings on symptoms. An intermittent pattern is common. BPPV may be present for a few weeks, then stop, then come back again.

HOW IS BPPV TREATED?

BPPV has often been described as “self-limiting” because symptoms often subside or disappear within six months of onset. Symptoms tend to wax and wane. Motion sickness medications are sometimes helpful in controlling the nausea associated with BPPV but are otherwise rarely beneficial. However, various kinds of physical maneuvers and exercises have proved effective.

Epley Maneuver

OFFICE TREATMENT OF BPPV: The Epley and Semont Maneuvers

There are two treatments of BPPV that are usually performed in the doctor’s office. Both treatments are very effective, with roughly an 80% cure rate, according to a study by Herdman and others (1993).

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PATIENTS AFTER OFFICE TREATMENTS (Epley or Semont maneuvers) 

  1. Wait for 10 minutes after the maneuver is performed before going home. This is to avoid “quick spins,” or brief bursts of vertigo as debris repositions itself immediately after the maneuver. Don’t drive yourself home. 
  2. Sleep semi-recumbent for the next two nights. This means sleep with your head halfway between being flat and upright (a 45 degree angle). This is most easily done by using a recliner chair or by using pillows arranged on a couch (see figure 3). During the day, try to keep your head vertical. You must not go to the hairdresser or dentist. No exercise which requires head movement. When men shave under their chins, they should bend their bodies forward in order to keep their head vertical. If eyedrops are required, try to put them in without tilting the head back. Shampoo only under the shower. Some authors suggest that no special sleeping positions are necessary (Cohen, 2004; Massoud and Ireland, 1996). We think that there is some value of doing these things.
  3.  For at least one week, avoid provoking head positions that might bring BPPV on again. 
  • Use two pillows when you sleep. 
  • Avoid sleeping on the “bad” side. 
  • Don’t turn your head far up or far down. 

Be careful to avoid head-extended position, in which you are lying on your back, especially with your head turned towards the affected side. This means be cautious at the beauty parlor, dentist’s office, and while undergoing minor surgery. Try  to stay as upright as possible. Exercises for low-back pain should be stopped for a week. No “sit-ups” should be done for at least one week and no “crawl” swimming. (Breast stroke is OK.) Also avoid far head-forward positions such as might occur in certain exercises (i.e. touching the toes). Do not start doing the Brandt-Daroff exercises immediately or 2 days after the Epley or Semont maneuver, unless specifically instructed otherwise by your health care provider.

  1. At one week after treatment, put yourself in the position that usually makes you dizzy. Position yourself cautiously and under conditions in which you can’t fall or hurt yourself. Let your doctor know how you did. 

 

What Kind of Physical Therapist Do I Need?

All physical therapists are prepared through education and experience to manage balance problems. However, you may want to consider:

  • A physical therapist with experience in treating people with balance or vestibular problems. Some physical therapists have a practice with a focus on treating older adults or people with balance or (vestibular) inner ear problems.
  • A physical therapist who completed special training in vestibular physical therapy. This physical therapist has advanced knowledge, experience, and skills that may apply to your condition.

If you need to find a skilled, hands-on Physical Therapist that deals with balance problems and vertigo well look no further! We are the best in the Inland Empire and you don’t just have to take our word for it… Check out our reviews on Google

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Check out our latest Episode of the Stay In The Game Podcast where I talk about some of the most common issues around balance and vertigo.

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